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    • Suicide & Crisis Lifeline

      If you or someone you know is in crisis, call or text:

      9-8-8
      (24/7, free & confidential)

      Or chat with a crisis counselor:
      Chat Now

      Peer-to-peer support for teens
      (Teen Line)
      800-852-8336
      6pm-10pm PST

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      For mental health or substance use services, call intake:

      LA County:
      888-807-7250

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    • Crisis Counseling

      If you or someone you know has experienced thoughts of suicide, made a suicide attempt, or lost someone to suicide, we provide healing during and through your crisis.

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  • Client Info
  • Donate
  • Get Help Now
    • Suicide & Crisis Lifeline

      If you or someone you know is in crisis, call or text:

      9-8-8
      (24/7, free & confidential)

      Or chat with a crisis counselor:
      Chat Now

      Peer-to-peer support for teens
      (Teen Line)
      800-852-8336
      6pm-10pm PST

    • Get Services

      For mental health or substance use services, call intake:

      LA County:
      888-807-7250

      Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:00pm

    • Crisis Counseling

      If you or someone you know has experienced thoughts of suicide, made a suicide attempt, or lost someone to suicide, we provide healing during and through your crisis.

      Get Help Today

Life After Suicide Loss: Navigating Grief with Rick Mogil

What happens when there is a suicide in the community? How does one even begin to process the depth of overwhelming emotions that come with a loss? More importantly, how do we heal?

Rick Mogil, Coordinator for the Survivors After Suicide (SAS), Bereavement Services Program at Didi Hirsch, is usually one of the first people to help facilitate the slow journey towards healing shortly after a loss occurs.

Since the early 2000s, Rick has provided debriefing services in Los Angeles County to families, schools, and businesses impacted by suicide. Debriefing with those immediately affected, usually within the first 30 days, allows survivors to process the shock and begin the initial stages of healing. During the debriefings, Rick holds space for even the toughest emotions, provides coping techniques, and sometimes, is a shoulder to cry on, quite literally.

Last year alone, Rick responded to 38 debriefings and over the course of his career, the number of debriefings he has facilitated is estimated to be upwards of 150. Of course, no two debriefings are the same, but what remains constant is his compassion, dedication, and deep understanding of the pain that comes with a loss.

Rick lost his younger brother, Ed, in January of 2003 to suicide. This was a time when there were very little publicized resources and support groups on suicide loss.

“I had nothing. Back in 2003, there were hardly any resources and I needed to talk to someone outside of my family,” said Rick.

Not knowing where to turn and in search of support for his grief, Rick attended an Al-Anon meeting. Al-Anon is a support group for those whose lives have been affected by another’s drinking. This was the closest resemblance to a support group that he knew of at the time, which gave him permission to share about his loss.

After hearing his story, a woman who knew of Didi Hirsch and their services approached him to tell him about their Survivors After Suicide (SAS) group. Rick refers to her as his guardian angel who kept following up to make sure he got the support he needed.

Rick officially became part of the Didi Hirsch team in 2007, three years after first attending a SAS support group and volunteering with the agency – co-facilitating groups and writing for the newsletter.

“Whenever I prepare to go to a debriefing, I always go back to my experience,” shared Rick. “What did I want when my brother died by suicide? What was it like for me?”

“It took me several years to realize that there’s nothing to fix – I can’t fix it,” Rick said in reference to his approach to facilitating groups and debriefings. “I couldn’t fix my brother. But I could be a facilitator – I can help people by giving them guidance. I can’t carry them anywhere, because I don’t know where they need to go, they do.”

To learn more about our Survivors After Suicide (SAS) program, support groups, and therapy options, visit crisiscare.org.

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